Tag Archives: chicago

I Thought I Left This Behind…

Before I became a teacher, I worked in advertising.  Specifically, I worked in direct response advertising.  Don’t know what direct response is?  Bet you do!  Ever seen this?

That’s right!  I was the miserable human on this planet forcing infomercials on you!  (My apologies, people.)

What a lot of people don’t realize about direct response advertising is that it can be just as pricey as regular advertising.  Not only that, but a lot of people don’t realize what counts as direct response.  For instance, religious programming, like Joel Osteen or Creflo Dollar, is counted as direct response.  Those preachers pay big bucks to a media company who then reps them out to different stations/brokers for airtime.  That airtime doesn’t come cheap either.  Good Christians are alive and well…and charging millions of dollars to help spread the word of Jesus.

Part of why I left advertising for teaching is because I couldn’t stand the fact that people were spending millions of dollars on hour-long advertisements for Feed the Children instead of, you know, spending that money on feeding the children.  Teaching appealed to me because it wasn’t about money and making someone richer, it was about helping and making a difference in this world.  I never, ever thought that I’d have the feeling money was blown on commercials that could have been directly helping students while working in education.  I thought I was safe.  After all, schools don’t make commercials.  They have no vested interest in advertising anything other than the first day of school.

So, imagine my surprise when I started getting bombarded with Rahm Emanuel’s friends’ awesome “infomercials” about greedy, money-grubbing teachers and how kids are getting a fair deal post-strike (because teachers don’t care about kids, but Rahm does!).  And then, to find out that his wealthy friends are paying millions of dollars to run these ads?  It’s like I got jolted back into time by about 10 years.  Why not really help the kids and donate that money to some schools?  Why not stop trying to spin things and start trying to fix things?  (Start with the TIFs.)

Peeps, I think Rahm was too flattered by all our signs about him during the strike.  He didn’t see that they were negative, he just saw his name everywhere in big letters and thought we wanted more of him, I suppose.  Hey Rahm, you misunderstood!  You were supposed to disappear for a while, like your friend.  Lay low.  Hide out.  Not be on my TV every hour on the hour.  Perhaps if you’d had better teachers as a child, your critical thinking skills would have been a little better (and you’d be able to memorize 35 seconds of speaking instead of having to read a teleprompter).

Insulting Ad #1 aired during the strike

Insulting Ad #2 aired after the strike

Advertisements
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Data

Anna Chao Pai (b. 1935)

I have a friend who always says, “Data is what you want it to be.”  Truer words have never been spoken, especially in the field of education.  When I first entered education, I was shocked, SHOCKED at the way data was compiled and used.  Since I entered Chicago’s public school system, I’ve fought back on the use of data to drive instruction.  I’ve repeatedly said that real statisticians would  simply laugh at the way schools use data.  We manipulate it to make it what we want it to be and make sweeping judgements about the state of our students’ learning based on these numbers.  And we only consider what we want to consider.

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What I Taught My Students Today

Today was the first day back to school.  It felt invigorating to be back in the building.  The kids seemed to really miss school and their teachers and the teachers seemed happy to be off the picket line and back in the classroom.  I can talk more later about whether or not our deal was as good as we’d hoped (we definitely made some concessions in terms of salary and wages in order to really benefit our students), but what I did today was showed students that every once in a while, a strike was necessary.  I had them read this article and this article.  Then, we discussed the similarities and differences between the Teacher Revolts that happened 79 years ago and the strike that happened seven days ago.  Let me tell, it saddens me that not much has changed.  It’s as if we just haven’t learned our lesson.

I’d like to think my students learned a bit about Chicago history today (and got some Common Core non-fiction in while they were at it).  What I hope they really learned though was just how much teachers love kids.  I hope they really learned that throughout history teachers have always stood up for the welfare and benefit of our students.  That no matter what anyone says, pay is often the last things on our minds.  After all, no teacher gets into teaching for the big bucks.  We do it because we want to make a difference in the world.  We do it because we are idealistic and hopeful that the day-to-dayness of our job will one day make a difference in a child’s life.

PS.  The coolest part of the day?  When we all met in the parking lot, wearing red, and entered the building together.  : )

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Some Photos from Week One, Prt. 2

Here are the rest of the best of photos from Week One of the CTU Strike.  Enjoy!

(All Photos by me; Please do not reproduce without my permission)

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Some Photos from Week One, Prt. 1

Picketing is no joke, guys.  It’s grueling work that you don’t get paid for.  Not that I’m demanding pay…I walked out on my job.  I’m just trying to correct a common misunderstanding that I’m getting paid for not working.  I’m not.  At all.  And I’m starting to feel it.

Yesterday was the first day of Week Two of the CTU Strike.  Our spirits were down today; we really wanted to be back in the classroom.  Still, we are unified in our fight for a fair contract and for the future of our schools.

Last week, I took 1500 photos.  After Day 1, I got a little behind uploading them and posting them, so I spent the better part of yesterday sifting through them and post-processing the best ones.  Here are some highlights from last week!  Hope you enjoy!

(All Photos by me; Please do not reproduce without my permission)

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Some Thoughts on Standardizing Teacher Effectiveness

Last year, I gave up approximately 35 days of classroom instructional time to give tests.  These tests included ACT-style, common assessments given by grade level teams (i.e. all the sophomore English teachers gave the same ACT-style test to their students) every five weeks (these tests usually took 2 days for students to finish), practice ACT tests given by the district, the EXPLORE/PLAN (a standardized test required by the state), the actual ACT (a standardized test required by the state), in addition to all the regular content-based exams (i.e. chapter quizzes for a novel, end of unit exams, etc.).  In a school year that is only 9.5 months long, that’s a TON of days to suck up just to give tests. The whole point of these tests is to help prepare kids for other tests.  But where does the time come to actually learn?

At my old school, when my former principal told my English Dept. chair that he had to integrate more test prep and more non-fiction, he replied, “But if we spend all this time preparing them for a test, when will they ever have the chance to just appreciate something beautiful?”  Remember that?  Remember that feeling when you would read or learned something in a class that just resonated with you and made you sit up a little straighter and pay attention a little more?  I know the text that did it for many of my students over the years.  I see the difference in them.  All of a sudden, something got their attention.

In my first year of teaching, I had a rough, rough 7th period class.  This class had become a dumping ground for bad students.  All the middle of the road students were in inclusion classes (these are classes that by law have a certain ratio of SpEd students and regular students so that SpEd students can be taught in the least restrictive environment) and the smart kids were in honors classes.  This meant that all the rough kids, the kids who didn’t care, and a handful of poor souls who actually did want to learn all ended up in my 7th period class.  I HATED those kids.  I dreaded going there every day.  I spent a lot of days yelling or standing around waiting for them to get the hint that I was ready to teach.  It was soooo frustrating.  One girl in particular, we’ll call her Ruby, hated me.  Every time I asked her to put her phone away or stop talking, I was met with such hostility and anger.  Finally, I just kind of left her alone.  I tried to focus more on the 10 kids who were there and doing work and really wanted to learn.  One day, I was teaching Benjamin Franklin’s The Autobiography.  This was around the same time as Tiger Woods’s big cheating scandal and I remembered my old professor telling me that Ben Franklin was quite the flirt and ladies man.  I decided that in order to get these kids to care about Ben Franklin, I had to up the ante.  I started telling them that Ben was like the Tiger Woods of his time.  That he was not only an incredibly intelligent inventor and writer who played a role in the founding of this country, but he was also a big time celebrity.  He dined with powerful political figures and held court with kings.  About halfway through my spiel, I looked up to see Ruby watching me closely.  She was rapt with attention and was hanging on my every word.  About ten minutes into class, I started to teach just for her.  I could see she was excited by the story and what I was reading to them.  Her excitement fueled my own teaching and the whole class started to get really interested in, of all things, Benjamin Franklin.  She was appreciating something beautiful.

After that, Ruby seriously improved in my class.  She took it more seriously, working hard to really improve her grades.  At a later report card pickup, she even told her mother I was her favorite teacher.  That’s the power of teaching.  It’s not something that can be replicated in every classroom because my approach, my teaching style, and my humor cannot be replicated; I cannot be replicated.

In everyone’s quest to “reform” public schools (aka privatize public schools), they claim the most powerful indicator of students outcomes is teacher effectiveness.  They think this can be measured by standardized tests.  That moment with Ruby?  That cannot be measured by a test.  Sure, you could point to her “growth” over the year, but what I did was probably more permanent than her ability to walk out of her sophomore year a better reader or writer.  Those things are important and they are somewhat measurable by a standardized test, but what is not is the passion I gave her to stop fooling around and start investing in her education.  She walked out a better person because of me and that will never be measurable by a standardized exam.  Unfortunately, this seems to be something everyone forgets.  I’m not just effective because of my ability to get kids to be better readers and writers and thinkers.  My efficacy lies in my ability to inspire.  And that can never be measured.

PS.  That 7th period class that I hated so much?  It ended up being my favorite by the end of the year and I won over almost all of those students.  Standardize that.

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A Fascinating Read…or Two

A few weeks ago, I got into a debate with a friend over the union.  She told me Karen Lewis wasn’t good for our union.  I respectfully disagreed.  After reading these two articles (here and here), I’m now realizing she’s way smarter than even I realized.  And I’m also realizing that she’s definitely smarter than our mayor and maybe even our president.

I’m proud to be striking and later today, I’ll share some additional thoughts on that later.  Right now, I’m too busy marching somewhere in the city and singing my new favorite hymn: “Hey, hey!  Ho, ho!  Rahm Emanuel’s got to go!”    Join me in a verse, won’t you?

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Highlights Day One

Some photographic highlights from Day One.  See you on the picket lines!

(Images by me)

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The More Things Change, The More They Stay the Same

Found this article from 1987, just after the last Chicago Teachers Union strike ended.  It’s interesting to me how we just never learn from history.  25 years ago, my predecessors were asking for some of the same things we’re asking for today.  When will we learn?

Are you wearing your red today?

(1987 Strike Image via Substance News)

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Tomorrow = History


Just received word from my union delegate.  The Chicago Teachers Union has rejected CPS’s offer and as of 12:01am tonight, the CTU will strike.  We will begin picketing at our respective schools beginning at 6:30 tomorrow morning.  The official press conference with the announcement will be held at 10pm tonight.  Check your local listings for coverage.  This means, for the first time in 25 years, the nation’s third largest school district will watch its 29,000 teachers and

walk off the job.  As a show of support, please wear red, the color of our union, tomorrow.

In solidarity!

(1987 Strike Photo with Jackie Vaughn via Substance News)

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